Archives for May 17, 2017

Frugal Entrepreneur Earns $5,600 a Month Farming Other People’s Yards

“The editorial content on this page is not provided by any of the companies mentioned, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are author's alone.”

Here’s a cool story at the intersection of entrepreneurship, frugal living, and sustainable farming. Jim Kovaleski is a one-man farm, growing produce and selling it at local farmers markets, earning over $5,000 a month. What’s unique is that he doesn’t have a central plot of land – he grows his plants on other people’s residential yards in Florida and Maine. Some stories say he “leases” the land but in the interview below he says he doesn’t pay in cash, only in veggies.

He’s profiled above on the Justin Rhodes YouTube channel. Found via Kottke.org.

This nomadic gardener travels between Maine to Florida gardening leased front yards. With a frugal lifestyle and revenues as high as $1.5K a week, he’s living the dream.

It’s not an easy job, but he gets to work on his own terms while developing a unique set of skills. I’m impressed both by the yield he gets from relatively little space, and how he keeps people’s front yards looking relatively nice (as opposed to industrial or commercial). If you live in a neighborhood with the right vibe (like my old one in SE Portland), this idea could probably be replicated.

Coffin Homes: Living in Tiny Spaces As a Last Resort

“The editorial content on this page is not provided by any of the companies mentioned, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are author's alone.”

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The Atlantic has a photojournalism article The ‘Coffin Homes’ of Hong Kong which startled me and challenged my idea of a “tiny” living spaces. The size reminded me of capsule hotels in Japan, except these are in much worse condition and are permanent residences. A sad and extreme example of high population density and lack of affordable housing.

Cheung reports that there is a “dark side to the property boom in wealthy Hong Kong, where hundreds of thousands of people priced out of the market must live in partitioned apartments, ‘coffin homes’ and other inadequate housing.” These residents are among an estimated 200,000 people in Hong Kong living in such tiny subdivided units, some so small that a person cannot even fully stretch out their legs.

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